The Sound of Memories

Hello, and a very Happy New Year to anyone who reads this blog.  It was a quiet Christmastime in our house, but even so, it is good to be getting back to normal, and to try and shed the pounds I have, no doubt, put on over Christmas.

Last evening, I was looking on Sky Movies, for something to watch for a few hours, and I found, The Sound of Music.  The thing about this film, for me, is that it is full of memories.  I would like to share them with you.

The movie came out, I think, in 1965, when I was eleven years old.  I know I was still eleven when I went to see it for the first time, because I came out singing

“I am eleven, going on twelve.”

At the time, we did not have colour TV at home, and I had only been to the pictures once before.  My mum and Dad, you see, did not have much money, and did not believe in wasting it on going to the pictures.  They preferred to take us out in the fresh air, but I always longed to go to the pictures.

An auntie of mine, called Betty, took me to see The Beatles first movie, ‘A Hard Days Night’, and I loved it, but the film was in black and white, so I didn’t see much colour at all.

When I heard about The Sound of Music, I longed to see it.  I had a cousin called Angela, who was married to a wonderful man called Norman.  One day they came to Auntie Betty’s home, while I was there, and invited her, and me, to go and see the film.  I was ecstatic!  I would be going out at night, in Norman’s car, to see a film I longed to see.  I felt wonderful.

It was a magical experience.  From the first shots of the mountains as the helicopter sweeps across the landscape, getting lower all the time until it zooms towards Julie Andrews, singing the title song, to the final shot of the family escaping over the mountains, to Switzerland, I was enthralled.  I remember hating The Baroness, who tried to come between The Captain and Maria, and I was really glad when she left and The Captain and Maria got married.  I was really excited when they were hiding from The Germans, and happy when they got away.

But the memory, for me, is bitter-sweet.  My lovely cousin-in-law, Norman, died about a year afterwards, of a sudden heart attack, so I always think of him, when I watch the film.

The second time I saw it was with my mum and sister, after Norman had died.  I loved seeing the film again, and this time, I had a bit more sympathy for The Baroness.  Despite her wealth, she was really a lonely woman, who thought she had met the man who would end her loneliness.  She loved him truly, and then had to watch him fall passionately for a younger woman.  I could, at last, see her point of view.  How she tried to get rid of her rival, and when she knew her cause was lost, she left with grace and dignity.  Over the years of watching the film. I grew to think that, maybe, she was the character who was the most real of all of them.

I saw The Sound of Music again, on a date when I was nineteen.  Once again it was magical, but the relationship with that particular guy, proved to be less so.  We didn’t stay together.

When I was twenty, myself, my sister and Auntie Betty, went to Austria, and actually saw many of the locations where the film was made, so now when I see the film, I can say that I have been there.

I have seen the movie many more times with Alan and other members of my family, on the television.  It still holds great power, and I always love it.  When I see it, I am once again with Norman, Angela and Betty, all deceased now, and I always feel that God is also in the movie.  It is one I know he would approve of.

I hope you have enjoyed this latest post.

Advertisements